My latest book is called The Life Journal. I have been researching and writing this for the last five years. It explains how and why a life journal can impact your life.

Journal writing is one of the most powerful and least known self-help tools. It can lead to dramatic improvements in virtually every area of our lives. In terms of personal growth, the techniques described in The Life Journal have been shown to improve your memory by a factor of 7, boost your productivity by 30% and increase the likelihood of achieving your goals by 50%!

Students attain higher grades at school, athletes better their performances in sport and, in the world of business, people who use a life journal have been shown to be 34% more productive than those who don’t, and sales men and women typically achieve increased sales using the simple journal writing strategies outlined in the book.

In relation to physical health and well-being, journal writing techniques are equally amazing. Medical researchers have discovered that they are as effective – and, in some cases, more effective – than many commonly prescribed medical drugs in alleviating the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and asthma.

Scientists have demonstrated that journal writing exercises can be as effective as counselling, group therapy and even anti-depressants in helping people cope during times of intense stress, trauma, loss and grief in addition to boosting our self-esteem.

Controlled clinical studies have revealed that keeping a journal can have an almost magical effect on the mind and body; it has been shown to improve liver function, stimulate the production of T-cells creating a stronger immune system, alleviate stress, reduce high blood pressure and strengthen lung function.

The astounding health benefits associated with journal writing inspired researchers to investigate the benefits it might offer to patients battling chronic, degenerative and life-threatening illnesses. Asthma, alcohol and drug addiction, arthritis, cancer, eating disorders, HIV infection, cystic fibrosis, chronic pain, insomnia, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression as well as post-operative healing were just some of the conditions that were shown to respond positively to the journal writing exercises outlined in The Life Journal. Symptoms were alleviated, recovery quickened and quality of life improved, all through a notebook and a pen and a willingness to spend 15 or so minutes each day writing.

The Life Journal will be available later this year. To stay informed, follow me on Twitter and Like my Facebook page.

Posted by adamjackson

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